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Love Throwing Things At People? Here's 8 Festivals You Need To Visit

Love Throwing Things At People? Here's 8 Festivals You Need To Visit image

Love Throwing Things At People? Here's 8 Festivals You Need To Visit

Let's face it, it's always fun to throw things at people.

Whether it be pillows, snowballs, popcorn or even that spider you just found - you've probably launched a fair few objects in the direction of your friends.

But in many cultures that sheer act of hurling items at random people is not only encouraged but often celebrated. Some you might have heard on your travels, others might be totally new to you.

Here's 8 festivals around the world where the sole aim, basically is to throw as many items as you can at each other.

Oh and if we've missed any out, do let us know in the comments below ok?

1. Gulal Throwing Festival (India)

"Gulal" is the Indian word for brightly coloured powder, it's these powders that in March each year are flung through the air to celebrate the famous Holi festival.

It's without question one of the most colourful festivals in the world and makes for some truly vivid photographs. What's the target? Anyone and anything located within the festival zones - just make sure you're wearing goggles.

2. Grape Throwing Festival (Spain)

The Spanish sure do love their wine, none more so that in the small town of Pobla del Duc. The grape throwing festival dates back to the 1930s and was created to celebrate the end of the harvest.

The actual festival itself is called "La Raima" and happens at the end of August each year. To put it into perspective, 90 tonnes of grapes are dumped into the town ready to be picked up and launched by the huge crowd of locals and tourists. You can imagine things get more than a little messy soon after.

3. Tomatina Throwing Festival (Spain)

Easily one of the biggest (and probably most well-known) festivals in the world, La Tomatina brings in crowds of up to 30,000 people to the tiny village of Bunol in Valencia (which only hold 9,000 locals).

Their purpose? To throw as many tomatoes as they can at one another. It's an annual festival, occurring on the last Wednesday of August and leads to utter carnage the following day.

To compliment all the tomatoes flying around, music, fireworks and even a parade round out the festivities which continue long into the night. If you're planning on going though, best book in advance - getting accommodation can often prove very difficult.

4. Tuna Throwing Festival (Australia)

With their entire country surrounded by water, it makes sense that Australia's throwing festival is based around fish, specifically tuna. The concept began back in 1962 where the idea was to promote the emerging tuna industry in Port Lincoln, all that was involve was hurling a tuna and seeing how far you could get it to go.

These days it's become a truly competitive event with leaderboards and past winners all available online. Throw the tuna the farthest and you too could be crown the Banska Tuna Toss World Champion - which lets face it, would look pretty cool on your CV if utterly pointless.

5. Orange Throwing Festival (Italy)

Prepare for a food fight!

The infamous orange throwing festival takes place in the Italian city of Ivera - but trust us when we say it's not for the faint-hearted. It's origins are both mysterious and rather illogical - but the legend goes that oranges were thrown to celebrate the decapitation (yes you read that correctly) of a rapist, who tried to force himself onto a newly married woman. You'd have to be throwing an orange pretty damn hard for it to decapitate someone...but we digress.

In modern times, teams compete in the festival, indeed there are often intense rivals at play. If you want to throw oranges at people you have to enlist in one of the local teams.

Tourists / spectators are not allowed to throw oranges at anyone and if they are wearing a red hat, are promised not be harmed. You can imagine the number of tourists that forget this minor detail can't you...

Our advice? Duck.

6. Wine Pouring Festival (Spain)

You've heard of Germany's iconic 'Oktoberfest' right? Well, Spain's 'Haro Wine Festival' which occurs in the La Rioja region is very similar - but it adds a dash of religion into the proceedings. The celebrations commence with a parade through the town where people carry jugs, bottles and even buckets of wine - all led by the town mayor.

At noon mass commences, where everyone is both serious and solemn in equal amounts. Talk about dampening the mood. But then almost instantly once mass ends, everyone literally pours wine all over each other. The result is a sea of people coloured purple, wine-soaked saved souls and some truly WTF moments.

7. Rags Mud Ants Throwing Festival (Spain)

Let's face it, it doesn't sound like the most fun festival in the world having dirty rags smacking you in the face repeatedly, but that's precisely what happens during the thousand year old festival in Galicia, Spain.

Why ants? Who knows. But apparently they are soaked in vinegar to keep them ready for action and then wrapped in handfuls of dirt (because lets face it throwing a handful of ants at someone 20 meters away isn't exactly practical) oh and the best part?

The ants are the biting variety. Don't say we didn't warn you.

8. Flour Eggs Throwing Festival (Spain)

The 'Els Enfarinats" festival dates back 200 years and kicks off every April Fool's Day in the town square of Ibi in the Alicante region of Spain. It's essentially one massive flour fight, which is why everyone looks like they've been in a snowstorm. In an interesting twist, anyone can gain power to create new laws within the town simply by defeating the town council with a hailstorm of flour and eggs.

Should you be victorious, all your laws are enforced throughout the day - any naughty individual that breaks them is fined on the spot with all proceeds going to local charities. It's be pretty hilarious if you made it mandatory that everyone had to walk around naked for the whole day wouldn't it!

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