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This Confronting Series Challenges The Way We See Birthmarks

This Confronting Series Challenges The Way We See Birthmarks  image

This Confronting Series Challenges The Way We See Birthmarks

This eye-opening series is a reminder that traditional beauty standards really don't matter. Everyone is different and that's what makes humanity beautiful. So why don't we celebrate the variety?

Shot by Copenhagen-based Linda Hasen, the series challenges viewers to move past their initial reaction to the marks. Rather than making a snap judgment or, worse, feeling pity for the subject, Hansen points out that these wine-red birthmarks are totally natural features. They tell a story and make the subject more unique. There shouldn't be a stigma attached to the marks.

“I want to make a confrontation,” Hansen said. “How long do you have to look? When do you start to see the other details in the photo? The nose, that the clothes are sitting a little wrong. All the small details which are really important. When you have looked enough at the person, the mark doesn’t become interesting anymore.”

“Every time people see the book, it’s like, ‘Wow, oh it must be hard,” says Hansen of her experience as the photographer.

But for her subjects, the comments are often much worse. “Did your boyfriend beat you?”, “Did you wash the rest of the paint off your face?”, or “You have your lipstick all over” are all common comments according to her subjects. Her hope is to change the perception of birthmarks.

“I compare it to having a tattoo: It’s curious, or a special mark with history. It’s beautiful,” Hansen says. “How come when you have a mark with nature, this is not OK?”

“Nobody can say that they’re not affected by how actors and top models look. We all are,” Hansen says. “I think the project is a reminder, for me, that those standards are not what’s important. We have to go against the ideal of what we’re confronted with from all kinds of medias… We all have our things that aren’t correct. And we shouldn’t be correct; that’s what makes someone a person. The differences between us. That is what’s interesting.”

Find more of her work here.

Via Feature Shoot

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