Strange Photos & Weird Illusions Before The Era Of Photoshop

Strange Photos & Weird Illusions Before The Era Of Photoshop image

Strange Photos & Weird Illusions Before The Era Of Photoshop

In an era where thousands of glossy magazine covers peer down their nose at you from the shelves, each complete with countless hours of retouching, editing, cropping and enhancements, it's easy to forget that photography wasn't always so easily or as frequently altered.  

Worldwide we point and tap our Instagrammifications on an almost hourly basis, adding filters, colours and frames - it's fun because it's simple, but it's not indicative of how photos use to be.

To create illusions & capture moments of magic, you didn't use an algorithm created by a third-party, you simply had to rely on your talent alone. And that's why we're featuring this peculiar series of photographs, all created, edited and altered long before the rise of digital processing, let alone Photoshop. 

We're talking as far back as the 1840's and its startling to think how the medium was being used and adapted as an art form even back then in those very primitive days of technology.

They're part of an exciting exhibition titled Faking It: Manipulated Photography Before Photoshopwhich is currently in its final weeks at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Interestingly enough, it's the 1st show they've housed that is entirely dedicated to manipulated photographs & images - before the rise of the digital revolution.

1. Man on Rooftop with Eleven Men in Formation on His Shoulders (1930)

2. Dream No. 1: "Electrical Appliances for the Home" (1950)

3. Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec as Artist and Model (1892)

4. The Vision (Orpheus Scene) (1907)

5. Hearst Over the People (1939)

6. Lenin and Stalin in Gorky (1949)

7. Man Juggling His Own Head (1880)

8. Room With Eye (1930)

9. Dirigible Docked on Empire State Building (1930)

10. The Two-Headed Man (1855)

11. Aberdeen Portraits No.1 (1857)

12. Fading Away (1858)

13. A Powerful Collision (1910)

You can find out more about the show and the 200 images featured right here, but in the meantime, enjoy this rather strange and compelling trip down memory lane...

Via Metropolitan Museum of Art